deathandmysticism:

Willem Claeszoon Heda, Vanitas, 1628

Timestamp: 1397129116

deathandmysticism:

Willem Claeszoon Heda, Vanitas, 1628

sassythought:

Art History Meme | 2/6 Themes or Series or Subjects 
» Memento Mori/Vanitas
By Philippe de Champaigne, Evert Collier, 
Adriaen van Utrecht, Bartholomäus Bruyn, David Bally, Franciscus Gysbrechts

When in overly moralized interpretations we reduce such paintings to pictorial sermons on vanity, we fail to grasp adequately the ambiguous wholeness of these images, which prompt us to reflect not upon mortality alone, but upon the ways in which life and death define each other. No label such as “vanity of vanities” or “death conquers all” or even “carpe diem” adequately conveys the complexity of such pictures, which are about both life and death, about being in and departing this world, about pleasure and its passing

Paul Barolsky. VANITAS PAINTING AND THE CELEBRATION OF LIFE. Source: Notes in the History of Art , Vol. 26, No. 2 (Winter 2007), pp. 38-39
Timestamp: 1397129096

sassythought:

Art History Meme | 2/6 Themes or Series or Subjects 
» Memento Mori/Vanitas
By Philippe de Champaigne, Evert Collier, 
Adriaen van Utrecht, Bartholomäus Bruyn, David Bally, Franciscus Gysbrechts

When in overly moralized interpretations we reduce such paintings to pictorial sermons on vanity, we fail to grasp adequately the ambiguous wholeness of these images, which prompt us to reflect not upon mortality alone, but upon the ways in which life and death define each other. No label such as “vanity of vanities” or “death conquers all” or even “carpe diem” adequately conveys the complexity of such pictures, which are about both life and death, about being in and departing this world, about pleasure and its passing

Paul Barolsky. VANITAS PAINTING AND THE CELEBRATION OF LIFE. Source: Notes in the History of Art , Vol. 26, No. 2 (Winter 2007), pp. 38-39

binarylove:

Alison Bickle

Timestamp: 1397128811

binarylove:

Alison Bickle

"What an odd thing a diary is: the things you omit are more important than those you put in."

Simone de Beauvoir, “The Woman Destroyed,” from The Woman Destroyed (via lifeinpoetry)

deepdownworld:

Marlene Dietrich. Flowers at her feet. After singing “Where Have All the Flowers Gone”. Through lens of Bengt H. Malmquist.

(Source: joancrawfish)

Timestamp: 1396954017

deepdownworld:

Marlene Dietrich. Flowers at her feet. After singing “Where Have All the Flowers Gone”. Through lens of Bengt H. Malmquist.

(Source: joancrawfish)

dentellesetfroufrous:

Diamante - Folies by Renaud

(via creepyyeha)